Tag Archives: Scrum

An agile cloze

Cloze
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I was just inspired by an german christmas cloze. It even inspired me so much, that I decided to write an agile cloze and let you fill the missing pieces :) So, here you are.

The best way _____________________.

Scrum is ______________ but XP _________________ with or without Kanban.

I currently read ______________ and think _____________.

___________ is the best thing that happened to our company because ____________.

Would you believe _______________.

_____________________ awesome.

If ______________ the world would be a better place.

Happy __________________.

You can either leave a comment or create a blog post based on the above cloze. I’m looking forward to your “fill-in” :)

10 things to mess up your retrospective

Retrospective
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It’s about time for a new list. Today, I decided to write a list on how to mess up your retrospective. There are a lot of possibilities to do this and the following tips will help you doing so 😉

1 – don’t prepare anything

As the retrospective is the simplest and least important meeting of all Scrum meetings, it doesn’t need any preparation. Just come together and start. Wait, where are the pens and the post-its? Forget about it! Just sit together and chat a bit.

2 – Start immediately

As there is no need to set the stage, start immediately with gathering data. Immediately start the retrospective with asking the two questions: “What went wrong?” and “What went well”. That should be sufficient to get great results.

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5 Reasons Why a Product Owner Team Might Be a Good Idea

Teamwork
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During this week I read an interesting article called “Is Scrum a –ism that doesn’t work for real?“. One of the things that @marcusoftnet mentioned in his article was this:

The product owner is an unicorn

I continue to read and had to agree with him in many points. The rest of the week I kept thinking about this and came to the conclusion that in some environments a product owner team would be a better fit. But what could be a good reason for a product owner team?

1 – Responsibility

One good reason might be a shared responsibility. In some companies it seems to be difficult to define THE one and only PO with all needed responsibilities. Even worse, I saw product owners, whose decisions were overruled by their bosses and managers. This does not only have a demotivating effect on the PO, but also the development team becomes insecure when working with her. When you have a PO team, it is much more difficult to overrule them.

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5 Signs That Your User Stories Suck

Stop Sign
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About one a half years ago, I wrote an article about how to mess up your user stories. In the meantime I saw other “User Stories” that gave me creeps. That’s why I decided to write this article. So here is my new list of signs, that your user stories suck…

1- Your user Stories Are Only a Wrapper

If your user stories only consist of one task, this is a sign that you just using them as a wrapper. I don’t know why, but it seems that some people believe, that they have to use the user story format for everything. A user story is “a promise for a conversation”. If there is nothing to discuss and it is a simple task, than write it down like this. Don’t wrap a pseudo user story around it. In most cases this is also a sign that your user stories are too small.

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11 Hints to Improve Your Scrum Meetings

I saw a lot of Scrum meetings out there, that are not more than a skeleton. Everybody is attending but nobody is participating. To improve such situations I collected 11 hints to improve your Scrum Meetings.

Daily Scrum

1 – Walk the Board

Instead of answering the “three questions”, which leads in most teams to answering only the first two questions, walk the board. This means, use your Sprint Backlog to talk about what is currently in progress and what is planned for today. That way you’re concentrating on the really important things, instead of talking about the past.

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